Victory Heights

Victory Heights is a beautiful North Seattle neighborhood situated halfway between Lake Washington and Green Lake, and Downtown Seattle and Lynnwood. Nicknamed “The Place of Towering Firs,” our quiet streets are lined with towering Douglas firs, pines, and other shady arboreals. Our residents take a strong pride in gardening, and any stroll will lead to beautiful yards, flowering bushes, chicken coops, beehives, treehouses, and more. In the Southwestern corner of our neighborhood, the Kingfisher Natural Area along Thornton Creek provides miles of hiking trails in foliage so dense you’ll forget you’re in a City, surrounded by hawks, owls, amphibians, and other wildlife along the stream.

The Victory Heights Playground serves as the recently-renovated central gathering point of our neighborhood, complete with a running track, playfield, tennis courts, and playground, and is home to the Victory Heights Cooperative Preschool.

We are conveniently located to the service and shopping centers of Lake City and Northgate, and less than a 20-minute drive to the larger communities of downtown, Bothell, Ballard, and Lynnwood and Edmonds.

Our community is a wonderful place to raise a family, retire, and serve as a jumping-off point to explore all the wonders of the Pacific Northwest. Come join us!

 

More from our neighborhood

Public Safety

Public Safety

Recreation

Recreation

Transportation

Transportation

History

As of 1859, the area known today as “Victory Heights” was mainly bogs and trees, with a “Military Road” (largely a dirt path) that ran along what is now Northgate Way to Bothell. In the early 20th Century, a “highway” was built that followed today’s Lake City Way, and then turned east at NE 94th Street, down what is now Ravenna Avenue NE. After World War 1, it became a “real state highway,” evolving to its present-day route, and was named “Victory Way” to reflect the patriotic times. 


A real estate developer named Goodwin decided to sell land in the bluff overlooking the highway, and called it “Victory Heights.” Lots were subdivided and sold as either convenient locations, or as potential farms to go into the boom-or-bust chicken business. One of the original structures still standing is a model Spanish-style home that sits at the top of 24th Avenue NE just before it intersects Northgate Way. Originally all the streets had colorful names; but the fire department soon put an end to that, insisting on uniform street numbers so buildings could be easily located in the case of emergency. Aerial photos show the Victory Heights developing, with massive growth from just a few houses in  1936, to being nearly completely built out by 1946.